Marc Quinn

Marc Quinn

Controversial British artist Marc Quinn, is often associated with Damien Hirst as one of the founding figures of the 1990s British contemporary art movement.

Quinn came to prominence in 1991 when he presented his sculpture Self, a cast of his head made from eight pints of his own frozen blood. Like much of Quinn’s work, this sculpture explored the materiality of the human condition by referencing the dualisms that define human life: spiritual and physical, surface and depth, cerebral and sexual. Purchased by Charles Saatchi, this artwork propelled Quinn into the limelight. He has since created Siren, a gold sculpture of Kate Moss presented as a modern-day Aphrodite and Alison Lapper Pregnant, a fifteen-ton marble statue of Alison Lapper, a pregnant disabled artist, exhibited on the fourth plinth at Trafalgar Square in London.

Although known for his sculptures, Quinn’s work takes on a variety of forms including painting, drawing, photography and installation. Each medium continues to explore the distanced relationship we have with our bodies, highlighting how the conflict between the ‘natural’ and ‘cultural’ has a grip on the contemporary psyche.