Art news / 10 – 16 September

We round up the art news, so you don’t have to. This week Rembrandt, Banksy (of course) and Gavin Turk.

1. Four of the infamous Dutch Master, Rembrandt’s, early works have been reunited (and only recently rediscovered) at the Ashmolean in Oxford. These paintings are meant as a series; each depicting one of the five senses: sight, hearing, touch and smell. The fifth – taste – is believed to also have painted by the teenage Rembrandt but it is yet to be discovered. So the gallery has created the hashtag #missingRembrandt in a bid to help find it.

Even so, it is big achievement to have all four senses together, as An Van Camp, the gallery’s curator says: “It is the first time these paintings will ever be on show together so it is an amazing thing. As a curator, this is the stuff you dream of … a world first. Even the owners of the paintings have never seen them together.” (via The Guardian)

Sensation: Rembrandt’s First Paintings, will be at the Ashmolean until 27 November – it is free to enter.

2. It has been announced that the largest-ever exhibition of the street artist Banksy in Australia in history will take place in Melborne later this year – without the artists involvement or permission – as with previous exhibitions in Istanbul and at Sotheby’s in 2014 – curated by Banksy’s former agent, Steve Lazarides.

The Art of Banksy will be exhibiting over 80 works by Banksy; some of which, have only recently been removed from the walls on which they were residing only months earlier. Also curated by Lazarides, the works on display in Melbourne will include some of Banky’s most iconic pieces, such as Girl with Balloon, Flag Wall and Laugh Now; other works will come from private collections – including the collection of Lazarides himself.

3. This week saw the New York Art book fair as busy as ever: the art fair included everything from tattoos given by Genesis Breyer P-Orridge and other artists for $250 at the Gagosian gallery (which earlier this year was embroiled in a law suit over a bust by Picasso); to clothes by cult conceptual artist Cory Arcangel; to book signings with particularly long lines for New York street artist, KAWS – famous for his subverting of advertisements and melancholy cartoon characters recently exhibited at the Yorkshire Sculpture park. (via Art News)

4. Damien Hirst’s Newport Street Gallery has announced that Gavin Turk will be the next artist to exhibit at Hirst’s south London gallery – following on from one of Hirst’s friends, renowned Pop Artist Jeff Koons’ exhibition, Now.

Who What When Where How and Why, will serve as a major retrospective for Turk – revered for pioneering many techniques and styles in sculpture, including the painted bronze and waxwork; his installations and sculptures deal with issues of authorship, authenticity and identity – showcasing works throughout his entire career (all three decades of it). The show features Cave, the now iconic blue plaque installation that was exhibited in Turk’s Royal College of Art degree show in 1991.

Hirst said, “I started collecting Gavin’s work twenty years ago. He’s an incredibly powerful artist, his work is about language and the spaces between things. He’s had a major impact on British art so it’s great to be able to show such an extensive collection of his work at Newport Street.”

Who What When Where How and Why, which is free to enter, runs from 23November 2016 to 19 March 2017

5. Last month Delacroix’s Liberty Leading the People was in the headlines over the burkini debate in France, and its leading lady, Delacroix’s topless Liberty – the personification of the triumph of the Republic. Now, it is in the news for an entirely different reason: Mummy Brown is a rare pigment made of ground up mummys – the ancient Egyptian kind. Mummy Brown was beloved of the likes of the Pre-Raphaelites, and it appears that Delacroix added Mummy Brown to his palette between 1824 and 1854 – he painted Liberty Leading the People in 1830 and could well have used Mummy Brown in its creation. The theory was put forward by the National Geographic. (via Art Net)