Harland Miller has joined the ocean conservation charity Project Zero to unveil a new artwork with Carnaby Art.

                                                Harland Miller with his piece Save The Penguins. Image: Project Zero

The artwork, Save The Penguin, is the latest addition to Carnaby Art, which celebrates creativity on the legendary Carnaby Street in London and its surrounding area.

Miller’s Save The Penguin features his typical sardonic humour, but also has a serious environmental message. The large artwork in shades of blue, mirroring the waves of the ocean, features text that says “Plenty More Plastic Bags In The Sea”, a play on the famous line for the heartbroken “Plenty More Fish In The Sea”. But it also harkens to the current environmental disaster the planet is facing, and concern for ocean life: a warning that before too long there many not be plenty more fish in the sea, and rather, plastic bags taking their place.

Of the inspiration for the piece Miller said, “Recently, while trawling though underwater footage of the sea, it seems that actually there aren’t plenty more fish in the sea – but there are plenty more plastic bags in the street.”

Other artists collaborating with Project Zero for CarnabyArt are pop star turned visual artist, Boy George and Mr. Brainwash, who has contributed a work called Keep Our Oceans Beautiful.

Carnaby Art says, “The work of art, a vinyl wrap measuring at 84.5m long and 11.55m high, has been unveiled to the public in the iconic shopping and dining destination, spanning Carnaby Street, Broadwick Street, and Ganton Street. The art installation will be in place until spring 2020, after which the wrap will be removed and used to create a permanent feature in Carnaby.”

Harland Miller’s Save The Penguins Image: Project Zero

“Each of the art pieces on show address the environmental impact on the ocean, an ongoing campaign in Carnaby and part of a continuing collaboration with Project Zero, which has included the 2019 Christmas installation and the Blue Turtle initiative.”

Miller’s Save The Penguin artwork is on view now on Marshall Street in London.

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