Updated April 2021

Banksy’s print prices on the secondary market have skyrocketed 270% between 2020–19. Here we reveal the auction records for every major Banksy print, what the market is demanding, and why.

The market for Banksy artworks is at a record high. His anti-establishment outlook is more relevant than ever, particularly in the global pandemic when authorities have a tighter grip on people’s lives. For those looking to buy a piece of Banksy’s rebelliousness, an original canvas can sell for hundreds of thousands, even millions, on the secondary market. The price of his prints is relatively more affordable: an edition of the same image might be obtained for tens of thousands, making it more attractive to younger or emerging buyers.

In 2020, Christie’s and Sotheby’s held three online auctions dedicated to Banksy prints, totalling close to £5million between them. In one Sotheby’s sale, 47% of the buyers were new to the auction house and 30% were under 40 years old. Meanwhile, in a Phillips auction in Hong Kong, an edition of Bomb Love sold for five times its value just 18 months ago – HK$525,000 vs HK$112,500.

Find out why the traditional auction model can’t keep up. 

View Top Prices Achieved for Banksy Prints by Series

Other reading:

  banksy market report 

The Banksy Print: The Most Investable Asset on the Market

Thanks to the certificates from authentication body Pest Control, buying a Banksy is an almost fake-proof purchase. First-time art buyers get a sense of security that they may not have with another artist, particularly if they are buying online and cannot check the artwork in person.

Banksy hasn’t released any new prints in years (the last was Sale Ends V2 in 2017 and, before that, Choose Your Weapon in 2010), which means the artworks on the market are becoming rarer. With Covid plummeting traditional assets like gold, property and stock, many investors are diversifying their portfolio into art and driving up demand. As proven by Bomb Love, those who purchased a Banksy even last year are now laughing their way to the bank.

Of course, hindsight is 20-20. The best time to buy a Banksy was 2004, when a signed edition of Girl With Balloon (with an iconic red balloon) would have cost you £150 – they now sell for well over £400,000. The second best time to buy is now.


Girl With Balloon

Girl With Balloon by Banksy - MyArtBroker

Banksy’s Girl With Balloon

Voted the nation’s favourite artwork in 2017, Girl With Balloon is undoubtedly one of Banksy’s most popular artworks with collectors.

The artwork was originally stencilled in London’s Southbank in 2002, accompanied by the message ‘There is always hope’. Seen as a symbol of love, loss of innocence and optimism – much-needed in these uncertain times – Girl With Balloon is recognised and adored across the world. Even singer Justin Bieber has a version tattooed on his arm.

Girl With Balloon consistently rocks the art world. An original stencil on the image, sprayed on the back of a cardboard backing from an Ikea frame, made headlines in March 2012 when it sold for £73,250 at Bonhams’ Urban Art auction.

Most recently and controversially, a signed canvas of Girl With Balloon self-destructed at a Sotheby’s evening auction in October 2018. Half destroyed by a secret shredder hidden in the frame, it was later legally designated as a new work of art by Pest Control, Banksy’s authentication body, and renamed Love Is In The Bin. Some suspected that Sotheby’s was in cahoots with Banksy all along, others think not; either way, Love Is In The Bin is the most talked-about stunt on the art market.

For all its fame, Girl With Balloon is one of the rarest and most sought-after of Banksy’s prints. The most famous variation of the print is the girl with a red balloon – modelled after the graffiti artwork – which Banksy released in 2004 (600 unsigned and 150 signed editions). But less known is that in the same year, Banksy also released a limited number of Girl With Balloon artist’s proofs (AP) prints with different coloured balloons, including purple, blue, pink and gold (88 signed in total).

What’s the auction record for Banksy’s Girl With Balloon series?

Unsigned: £300,250 from Bonhams on 15 December 2020.

Signed: £475,000 from Christie’s online auction in April 2021.

Artist’s Proof: £1,104,000, paid for a rare Girl with Balloon – Colour AP (Gold) at Sotheby’s on 26 March 2021.

Back up

Love is In The Air (Flower Thrower)

Love is In The Air by Banksy - MyArtBroker

Banksy’s Love Is In The Air (Flower Thrower)

Love is In The Air, also known as Flower Thrower, first appeared as a stencilled graffiti on the West Bank Wall, Jerusalem, in 2003. The wall was already a giant canvas for art and text protesting against its construction. Love is In The Air depicts a masked rioter in the middle of throwing a bouquet of flowers – turning an act of violence and aggression into a symbol of love and peace.

The artwork is among Banksy’s most famous images. It featured on the cover of Banksy’s book, Wall and Piece, in 2005, and has been unofficially reproduced on t-shirts, phone covers and other merchandise around the world. Most recently, the work made headlines in September 2020 when Banksy lost his trademark for the artwork to a greeting card company – the anonymous street artist could not prove he was the creator of Love is In The Air without revealing his identity.

Beyond the stencilled image, Banksy has created Love is In The Air as several canvases, as well as a limited edition screenprint in 2003 (500 unsigned and 150 signed editions, along with 27 artist’s proofs).

What’s the auction record for Banksy’s Love Is In The Air series?

Unsigned: £214,200 from Sotheby’s online auction in September 2020.

Signed: £475,000 from Christie’s online auction in April 2021.

Artist’s Proof: US$687,500 (£509,368) from Christie’s Post War and Contemporary Day Sale on 3 December 2020.

Back up

Banksy’s Rats

“Rats represent the triumph of the little people. The undesirables and the unloved. Despite the efforts of the authorities, they’ve survived, they’ve flourished, and they’ve won,” Banksy wrote in the run-up to his 2005 London exhibition Crude Oils, which featured 164 live rats in the gallery space.

Rats are one of Banksy’s greatest inspirations, which he uses to represent the pitfalls of society, work and consumerism.

Placard Rats

Gangsta Rat by Banksy - MyArtBroker

Banksy’s Gangsta Rat

This series shows three individual protesting rats. Because I’m Worthless is a pun on L’Oreal famous marketing tagline “Because I’m Worth it”; Get Out While You Can is taken from George Marshall’s business book on how to escape the rat race, and Welcome To Hell is a nihilistic greeting to modern life. Each of the three Placard Rat artworks was released in 75 signed and 175 unsigned editions.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Placard Rat series?

Unsigned: £94,000 for a Get Out While You Can rat, from Bonhams in London on 25 February 2021.

Signed: £144,300 for a Welcome to Hell rat, from Forum Auctions London on 7 December 2020.

Read our Guide to Banksy Rats.

Back up

Love Rat 

Banksy first created Love Rat as a graffiti piece in Liverpool, then released the artwork as a screenprint in 2004, with 150 signed and 600 unsigned editions. Given that “love rat” is another name for an adulterer, Banksy has joked that Love Rat prints would make an “ideal [gift] for a cheating spouse”.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Love Rat series?

Unsigned: £67,600, from Forums Auctions London on 5 March 2021.

Signed: £137,500, from Tate Ward Auctions on 9 December 2020.

Back up

Radar Rat

Created in 2004, Radar Rat (also called Sonic Rat) was released in only 75 signed editions. It is now among Banksy’s rarest and most desirable Rat prints due to its small edition size. The hand-painted spiral behind the rat can be red or orange. On its original release, Radar Rat cost £300.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Radar Rat series?

Unsigned: £19,500, from Forum Auctions London on 6 July 2017.

Signed: €47,212 (£42,328), from Digard auction house in Paris on 1 June 2015.

Back up

Gangsta Rat

Depicting an urban rat with a New York Mets cap, a thick chain necklace and a boom-box stereo, Gangsta Rat pays tribute to rap and hip-hop fashion of the 1980s and ’90s. The ‘iPOW’ tag, meanwhile, is a parody of Apple branding and also references Banksy’s then-print publisher, Pictures on Walls. Banksy has created numerous iterations of Gangsta Rat, including graffiti pieces in London in 2004 and 2006, and in New York in 2013.

The first Gangsta Rat print, with a red ‘iPOW’, was released in 2004 as 150 signed and 350 unsigned editions. In 2015, Banksy released new editions in pink (46), mint green (8), green (20), orange (61), blue (61) and grey for special VIP collectors for Dismaland in Weston-super-Mare (61).

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Gangsta Rat series?

Unsigned: £78,000 for a red edition, from Forums Auctions London on 5 March 2021.

Signed: £149,500 for a red edition, from Forum Auctions London’s sale on 7 December 2020.

Special colour editions: £68,750 for a mint-green edition, from Sotheby’s on 18 September 2018.

 

Back up

CND Soldiers

CND Soldiers by Banksy - MyArtBroker

Banksy’s CND Soldiers

Banksy’s notorious anti-war artwork was first stencilled outside the Houses of Parliament in 2001, during an anti-war protest by campaigner Brian Haw. Although authorities later removed the original mural, CND Soldiers has lived on as a defiant political statement against violence.

CND Soldiers was released as a silkscreen print in 2005 (350 unsigned and 350 signed editions).

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s CND Soldiers series?

Unsigned: JPY7,820,000 (£57,722), from SBI Art Auction on 31 October 2020.

Signed: £93,600, from Forum Auctions London’s sale on 7 December 2020.

Back up

Christ with Shopping Bags

 

Banksy - Christ With Shopping Bags

Banksy’s Christ with Shopping Bags

Also known as CWSB or Consumer Jesus, Christ with Shopping Bags was released in 2004 as only 82 signed edition prints. Unusually for Banksy, the image was made only as an edition and is not based off a graffiti artwork. Christ with Shopping Bags is a clear satire of shopping as the new ‘opium of the people’. Jesus, weighed down by retail therapy (which includes a candy cane and a Mickey Mouse toy), contrasts consumerism with the values of Christianity – charity, generosity and gratitude.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Christ With Shopping Bags series?

Signed: £175,000, from Christie’s online auction on 10–23 September 2020.

Back up

Nola

Nola by Banksy - MyArtBroker

Banksy’s Nola

Also known as Umbrella Girl and Rain Girl, Nola first appeared on the streets of New Orleans (also called Nola) in 2008, three years after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina. The image of a girl being rained on from inside the umbrella is a criticism of the Louisiana government’s lack of support and even complicity – what was supposed to offer protection actually created more damage.

Nola was first released as a print with white raindrops (289 signed editions), then later with coloured rain – including grey (63 signed editions), neon orange (32 signed editions), neon yellow (31 signed editions) and multicoloured rain (66 signed editions).

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Nola series?

Signed white rain: £150,000 from Christie’s online auction in April 2021.

Signed colour rain: £226,800, paid for a Nola (Green Rain) at Sotheby’s online auction in September 2020.

Back up

Choose Your Weapon

Choose Your Weapon (grey) by Banksy

Banksy’s Choose Your Weapon (grey)

Choose Your Weapon, or CYW, first appeared on the wall of a pub in Bermondsey, London, in 2010. The work depicts a hooded man walking a cartoon dog – a clear homage to American Pop artist Keith Haring’s barking dog motif. Haring, like Banksy, also found fame through his street art around New York in the early 1980s. The message behind Choose Your Weapon refers to dogs becoming an alternative weapon on the streets of the UK. Limited edition prints of the artwork were released in 2010, in 18 different colours.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Choose Your Weapon series?

Signed: £302,400, paid for a Choose Your Weapon (Fluoro Green), from Sotheby’s online auction in March 2021.

Back up

Flying Copper

Flying Copper by Banksy - MyArtBroker

Banksy’s Flying Copper

Flying Copper first appeared in Banksy’s first major exhibition, Turf War, in East London in 2003. Though made almost 20 years ago, the satirical contrast between the heavily armed police officer and his cartoonish smiley face remains timely and important in 2020’s struggles with police violence.

The artwork was first released as screenprints in 2003, one variation with a pink background (63 signed editions), one with a blue background (600 unsigned and 150 signed editions) and one blue-background variation with a pink smiley face.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Flying Copper series?

Unsigned: HK$819,000 (£78,643) from Phillips in Hong Kong on 4 December 2020.

Signed: £110,500, from Forums Auctions London on 5 March 2021.

Back up

Bomb Love

Bomb Love by Banksy - MyArtBroker

Banksy’s Bomb Love

Also called Bomb Hugger or Bomb Girl, Bomb Love explores the clash between love and war, even suggesting that love can conquer all. Banksy made the first version of the artwork as a mural in East London in 2003, then in Brighton a few months later.

Banksy first released Bomb Love as a screen print in 2005, featuring a fluorescent pink background (600 unsigned and 150 signed editions). Over the years, he has reproduced the image in different colour variations, on canvas and on placards.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Bomb Girl series?

Unsigned: HK$525,000 (£523,199) from Phillips in Hong Kong on 19 October 2020.

Signed: £128,700, from Forum Auctions London’s sale on 27 October 2020.

Back up

Rude Copper

Rude Copper by Banksy - MyArtBroker

Banksy’s Rude Copper

The original Rude Copper was sprayed as a mural in London and featured two police officers. The image follows many of Banksy’s works that criticise the authorities figures, like Flying Copper and CND Soldiers. The screenprint of Rude Copper, debuted in 2002, is considered Banksy’s first commercial print. The most sought-after version is an extremely rare signed edition, featuring a hand-finished spraypaint mark over the policeman. There also exist 250 unsigned editions.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Rude Copper series?

Unsigned: CHF61,300 (£51,121) from Koller Zurich on 5 December 2020.

Signed: £162,500, for a screenprint with a unique yellow spray paint from Forum Auctions London’s sale on 4 September 2020.

Back up

Barcode

Barcode by Banksy - MyArtBroker

Banksy’s Barcode

Barcode, sometimes referred to as Barcode Leopard, is an early Banksy print released in 2004 (150 signed and 600 unsigned editions). The image calls attention to the illegal black-market trade for big cats, with the barcode attempting to bind animals with consumerism. The barcode imagery is a longstanding motif of Banksy’s – the graffiti artist reportedly stencilled it on a wall in Bristol in 1999 or 2000, before he moved to London.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Barcode series?

Unsigned: £100,250 from Bonhams on 9 December 2020.

Signed: £136,500, from Forum Auctions London’s sale on 7 December 2020.

Back up

Donuts

Donuts by Banksy - MyArtBroker

Banksy’s Donuts

Unlike most of Banksy’s screenprints, Donuts was never originally a graffiti work. The image was first created on canvas in 2009 with a pink doughnut and was later released as a print in two colourways – 299 signed Strawberry Donuts editions (pink) and 299 signed Chocolate Donuts editions (brown). The 299 edition number references Krispy Kreme Doughnuts closing 299 stores in 2007. Donuts has been interpreted in many ways, from the idea that it is a parody of overzealous cops in American pop culture to the argument that authorities only protect corporate interests.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Donuts series?

Signed, special edition: £247,000 for a Donuts (Special Edition – Chocolate), from Forum Auctions London’s sale on 7 December 2020.

Signed, standard edition: £87,750 for a Donuts (Chocolate), from Bonhams in London on 25 February 2021.

Back up

Morons

Morons by Banksy - MyArtBroker

Banksy’s Morons

Never afraid to bite the hand that feeds him, Morons is Banksy’s satirical response to the auction world. The image references Christie’s record-breaking sale of Vincent van Gogh’s Sunflowers in 1987 but, instead of the painting, Banksy has scrawled ‘I can’t believe you moron actually buy this shit’.

The first Morons screenprint, an edition of 100 unsigned prints, was released at the artist’s Los Angeles exhibition Barely Legal in 2006, where it sold for $500 apiece. The artwork was later rereleased in different colours as both signed and unsigned editions.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Morons series?

Unsigned: HK$907,200 (£87,113), from Phillips in Hong Kong on 4 December 2020.

Signed: £100,100, from Forum Auctions London on 7 December 2020.

Back up

Laugh Now

Banksy - Laugh Now (Artist Proof)

Banksy’s Laugh Now

One of Banksy’s earliest and most recognisable works, Laugh Now was originally a six-metre long mural commissioned for the Ocean Rooms nightclub in Brighton. The artwork was released as a print in 2003, with 150 signed and 600 unsigned editions. The original work from Ocean Rooms sold at Bonhams in 2008 for nearly half a million dollars, setting an auction record price for Banksy at the time.

What’s the auction record for Banksy’s Laugh Now series?

Unsigned: HK$882,000 (£84,693) from Phillips in Hong Kong on 4 December 2020.

Signed: £200,250 from Bonhams in London on 25 February 2021.

AP: $75,000 (£57,675) from John Moran Auctioneers in California on 18 February 2020.

Back up

Pulp Fiction

Pulp Fiction by Banksy - MyArtBroker

Banksy’s Pulp Fiction

“We should have shotguns for this kind of deal,” Jules (Samuel L. Jackson) famously grumbled in Pulp Fiction. Banksy’s homage to Quentin Tarantino’s 1994 movie shows the lead characters Jules and Vincent (John Travolta) holding not pistols but, more absurdly, bright yellow bananas.

The image was originally a graffiti work sprayed near London’s Old Street station in 2002. Banksy released it as 150 signed and 600 unsigned edition prints in 2004. The original graffiti was removed by authorities in 2007 but Banksy later made a new Pulp Fiction street art – turning the previous concept on its head, this time the characters held real pistols but wore banana costumes.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Pulp Fiction series?

Unsigned: £81,500, from Bonhams in London on 9 December 2020.

Signed: £159,900, from Forums Auctions London on 5 March 2021.

Back up

HMV

HMV by Banksy - MyArtBroker

Banksy’s HMV

HMV, also called His Master’s Voice or Rocket Dog, shows music firm HMV’s terrier dog mascot taking a bazooka rocket to the gramophone. The work was first tagged in Bristol in 2003 and has been interpreted as Banksy’s criticism of the corporate music industry, as well as youth taking a shot at archaic conservatism. Banksy released 150 signed and 600 unsigned editions of HMV in 2003. The artwork also exists as unique works on canvas.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s HMV series?

Unsigned: £62,750, from Bonhams in London on 9 December 2020.

Signed: £80,600, from Forum Auctions London’s auction on 27 October 2020.

Back up

Happy Choppers

Happy Choppers by Banksy - MyArtBroker

Banksy’s Happy Choppers

Happy Choppers is one of Banksy’s many works denouncing the military. The contrast between the menacing weaponry and the cute pink bow mocks the machoism of warfare, while also suggesting the military’s attempts to appear as a harmless peace enforcer is fooling no one.

Happy Choppers first appeared as a graffiti at London’s Whitecross Street Market in 2002. Banksy released the artwork as a screen print a year later – with 150 signed editions, of which 33 were artist’s proofs, and 600 unsigned editions.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Happy Choppers series?

Unsigned: £63,000 from Sotheby’s online auction in March 2021.

Signed: £106,250, from Christie’s online auction in September 2020.

Artist’s Proof: $40,075 (£30,665) from Bonhams Los Angeles on 7 May 2019.

Back up

Grannies

Grannies by Banksy - MyArtBroker

Banksy’s Grannies

Grannies was created as an original screenprint for Banksy’s Barely Legal exhibition in Los Angeles in 2006. In this work, two elderly ladies knit jumpers that say “Punk’s Not Dead” and “Thug For Life” while they sip a pot of tea. The artwork has been read as older generations supporting the youth movement but also, conversely, as a criticism that all counterculture eventually becomes mainstream and socially acceptable.

Grannies was first released as 100 unsigned editions for Banksy‘s Barely Legal exhibition in 2006. The artwork was then re-released a year later in 150 signed editions and 600 unsigned editions, as well as 11 hand-finished signed prints.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Grannies series?

Unsigned: £56,500, from Bonhams on 9 December 2020.

Signed: £107,100, from Sotheby’s online auction in March 2021.

Back up

Monkey Queen

Monkey Queen by Banksy - MyArtBroker

Banksy’s Monkey Queen

Chimpanzees, like rats, are one of Banksy’s trademark motifs. The primates feature from his early works like Laugh Now to the auction record breaking canvas, Devolved Parliament. An artwork of Monkey Queen made headlines in 2002 when authorities tried to remove it from the window of a Gloucestershire youth club called The Chill Out Zone, deeming the work inappropriate in the run-up to Queen Elizabeth II’s Golden Jubilee celebrations. The youth leaders at the club eventually replaced Monkey Queen with a poster of the Union Jack.

Banksy released the artwork in 2003 as an edition of 600 unsigned and 150 signed prints.

What’s the auction record for Banksy’s Monkey Queen series?

Unsigned: HK$504,000 (£48,396) from Phillips in Hong Kong on 4 December 2020.

Signed: £70,200, from Forum Auctions London’s auction on 27 October 2020.

Back up

Sale Ends

Banksy’s Sale Ends

For anyone who has mourned the loss of a good deal, Sale Ends is for you. The artwork was first created as 100 unsigned editions for Banksy’s infamous Barely Legal exhibition in Los Angeles in 2006, where it was sold for $500 apiece. A year later, the graffiti artist’s then-print publisher Picture on Walls released an additional 150 signed editions.

In 2017, when Pictures On Walls announced they had ‘been taken over by venture anti-capitalists and will cease trading’ at the end of the year, they held a closing down sale where – appropriately – they released a few remaining editions of Sale Ends, as well as 500 prints of a reworked version now known as Sale Ends V2.

What’s the auction record for Banksy’s Sale Ends series?

Unsigned: €50,700 (£44,864) from Digard in Paris on 12 June 2017. 

Signed: £52,920 for a Sale Ends V2, from Sotheby’s online auction from 9–18 September 2020.

Printer’s Proof: £43,750, from Phillips on 23 January 2020.

Back up

Stop And Search

Stop And Search by Banksy

Banksy’s Stop And Search

In this biting satire of the UK’s controversial ‘stop and search’ legislation – first introduced in the 1980s – Dorothy from the family-friendly film The Wizard of Oz is questioned by a uniformed police officer about the contents of her wicker basket. The legislation was intended to deter crime, but critics have argued that it discriminates against ethnic minorities, who are subjected to far more searches. Like Rude Copper and Flying Copper, Banksy’s Stop and Search addresses the rise of the police state and suggests that even the virtuous are not safe from their control. The print was released in 2007 in 500 signed editions.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Stop And Search series?

Signed: £112,500, from Christie’s online auction in April 2021.

Back up

Bomb Middle England

Bomb Middle England by Banksy

Banksy’s Bomb Middle England

Banksy’s Bomb Middle England was first spray-painted on a wall in Bristol, before it was released in 2003 in 50 signed editions and 500 unsigned editions, along with 31 signed artist’s proofs. The artwork depicts three old ladies playing boules with lit cannonballs. Many interpretations have been placed on Bomb Middle England: are the ladies the indifferent bourgeoisie, inflicting violence on other people without a care, or are they attacking the establishment from the inside? This early work can be seen as a companion piece to Banksy’s screenprint Weston Super Mare, made in the same year and also featuring the elderly.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Bomb Middle England series?

Unsigned: £46,800, from Forums Auctions London on 5 March 2021.

Signed: £13,200, from Bonhams in London on 5 February 2008.

Artist’s proofs: £28,600, from Forum Auctions London on 21 March 2017.

Back up

No Ball Games

No Ball Games (Grey) by Banksy

Banksy’s No Ball Games (Grey)

A perfect illustration of Banksy’s satirical wit, No Ball Games shows two children playing catch with a red street sign that says “No Ball Games”. The artwork mocks the overprotective and interfering ‘nanny state’, which Banksy believes restricts both society and personal choice. But here, the government’s attempt to control an innocent children’s game is unsuccessful.

No Gall Games was first made as a canvas for Banky’s Barely Legal exhibition in Los Angeles in 2006. In 2009, he produced the artwork as a graffiti mural in Tottenham, North London, as well as a signed edition of 250 prints on green and grey backgrounds.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s No Ball Games series?

Signed, green background: HK$1,134,000 (£108,891) from Philips in Hong Kong on 4 December 2020.

Signed, grey background: £97,500, from Forums Auctions London on 5 March 2021.

Back up

Flags

Flags by Banksy

Banksy’s Flags

Flags, or simply Flag, first appeared in 2006 at Santa’s Ghetto, Banksy’s pop-up exhibition on London’s Oxford Street, where the public had the opportunity to buy affordable works from urban and underground artists. Flags shows a group of children raising an American flag in a dystopian landscape – similar to the iconic 1945 photograph Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima by Joe Rosenthal – suggesting that the next generation will reclaim and triumph in a world ruined by adults.

Flags was released in 2006 in two colourways: silver (1,000 unsigned editions) and gold (112 signed editions). There is also a special edition Formica Flags print released in 2007 in 20 signed editions (silver) and 23 signed editions (gold).

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Flags series?

Unsigned: £44,100 from Sotheby’s online auction in September 2020.

Signed: £72,562 from Bonhams in London on 08 October 2020.

Back up

Napalm

Napalm by Banksy

Banksy’s Napalm

Banksy’s Napalm, also called Can’t Beat That Feeling, is a reimagining of Nick Ut’s award-winning photograph The Terror of War from 1972. But here, young napalm victim Phan Thi Kim Phuc is flanked by Mickey Mouse and Ronald McDonald. Are these two corporate mascots helping her or leading her to a worse fate? Banksy asks. Napalm was released in 2004 in three colourways (orange, grey and white), each in 600 unsigned and 150 signed editions, along with 27 artist’s proofs.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Napalm series?

Unsigned: £50,400 from Sotheby’s online auction in March 2021.

Signed: £71,500 from Forum Auctions London on 27 January 2021.

Artist’s Proof: £81,900 from Phillips in London on 21 January 2021.

Back up

Weston Super Mare

Weston Super Mare by Banksy

Banksy’s Weston Super Mare

Banksy has described his artwork Weston Super Mare, with characteristic irony, as “a cheerful tribute to the great British seaside towns”. The town of Weston Super Mare is only 20 miles from Banksy’s hometown Bristol, and the graffiti artist would host his Dismaland “bemusement park” there in 2015. Weston Super Mare was released as a print in 2003 in 750 unsigned and 150 signed editions.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Weston Super Mare series?

Unsigned: £36,400 from Forum Auctions London on 5 March 2021.

Signed: £74,100 from Forum Auctions London on 27 January 2021.

Back up

Toxic Mary

Toxic Mary by Banksy

Banksy’s Toxic Mary

Banksy’s Toxic Mary has been called blasphemous for suggesting the Virgin Mary is feeding her baby with a poisoned bottle. Unlike his other print Christ with Shopping Bags, there is no irony or humour to Toxic Mary – making it one of Banksy’s bleakest artworks. Toxic Mary has been interpreted as an attack on religion; a criticism of the toxic ideas that parents pass onto their children; or a comment on commercial baby formula over breast milk. The screenprint was released in 2003 in 50 signed and 600 unsigned editions – along with artist’s proofs in red, pink and blue.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Toxic Mary series?

Unsigned: £88,200 from Sotheby’s online auction in March 2021.

Signed: £71,500 from Forum Auctions London on 27 January 2021.

Artist’s Proof: £119,700 for a Toxic Mary Colourway Gold & Pink from Sotheby’s online auction in March 2021.

Back up

Very Little Helps

Very Little Helps by Banksy

Banksy’s Very Little Helps

Very little Helps, also called Tesco Flags or Tesco Kids, is Banksy’s cutting reference to the irony of Tesco’s slogan, “Every Little Helps” – especially when supermarkets chains like Tesco are taking over the high street and putting small, independent greengrocers out of business. The artwork was originally a mural on the side of a pharmacy in North London. In 2008, Banksy released Very Little Helps as 299 signed editioned prints.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Very Little Helps series?

Signed: JPY13,915,000 (£96,998) from SBI Art Auction in Tokyo on 30 January 2021.

Back up

Trolleys

Trolleys by Banksy

Banksy’s Trolleys

Banksy’s Trolleys, also called Trolley Hunters, is a biting comment on modern man’s inability to fend for himself. With so many supermarkets and convenience stores, we have lost all knowledge on how to grow or forage for real food, says Banksy.

The message is so relevant that Banksy has released Trolleys twice as prints. The first time was in 2006, for his Barely Legal exhibition in Los Angeles – this version has a white background and was released in 500 unsigned editions. Later 2007 editions include Trolleys (Colour) with a blue-and-yellow background (750 signed editions); a new white background version (500 unsigned and 150 signed editions); and a special ‘Bethlehem’ edition only sold at the 2007 Santa’s Ghetto (28 signed editions).

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Trolleys series?

Unsigned: JPY9,545,000 (£66,536) for a 2007 Trolleys (white background) from SBI Art Auction in Tokyo on 30 January 2021.

Signed: HK$1,008,00 (£96,792) for a Trolleys (Colour) from Phillips in Hong Kong on 4 December 2020.

Back up

Soup Can and Soup Cans (Quad)

Soup Can by Banksy

Banksy’s Soup Can

Like his artwork Kate Moss, Banksy’s Soup Can is a clear homage to Andy Warhol’s famous Campbell Soup series. But while Warhol created 62 flavours of Campbell soups, Banksy only offers one – Tesco Value cream of tomato. The artwork is a cutting remark about the rising austerity in Britain and the stark lack of choice when surviving on a low income.

Banksy’s original Soup Can screenprint was released in 2005 as 50 signed and 250 unsigned editions. He later released special Soup Can in 10 signed editions in 28 different colourways. In 2006, Banksy released Soup Cans (Quad) or Four Soup Cans, featuring four soup cans on the same sheet. Soup Cans (Quad) is available in two variations: on grey paper (12 signed editions) and cream paper (54 signed editions).

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Soup Can series?

Original, unsigned: NZ$169,200 (£85,361) from International Art Centre in Auckland on 11 August 2020.

Original, signed: £75,000 from Christie’s online auction in April 2021.

Special colourway, signed: $126,000 for a Soup Can – Purple / Orange / Blue, from Sotheby’s online auction in December 2020.

Soup Can Quads, signed: £104,000, for a Soup Cans Quad Gold on Grey variation from Forum Auctions London on 7 December 2020.

Back up

Queen Victoria

Queen Vic by Banksy

Banksy’s Queen Victoria

One of Banksy’s most controversial and anti-royalist artworks, Queen Victoria or Queen Vic depicts the famously humourless English monarch sitting on another woman’s face – a sex act known as ‘queening’. Queen Victoria was released in 2003 in 50 signed and 450 unsigned editions. The print’s most famous collector is American singer Christina Aguilera, who purchased an edition in 2006.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Queen Victoria series?

Unsigned: £52,000 from Forum Auctions London on 27 January 2021.

Signed: £60,000 from Christie’s online auction in September 2020.

Back up

Kate Moss

Kate Moss by Banksy

Banksy’s Kate Moss

Banksy’s Kate Moss is a clear homage to Andy Warhol’s Marilyn Monroe portraits, down to the same Pop Art style and even coiffed hair. Banksy has created Kate Moss in multiple colourways, including original light blue (50 signed editions); pink, magenta, purple, apricot and blue (20 signed editions each); and artist’s proofs. In 2011, Banksy created a unique edition for Kate Moss herself to celebrate her wedding.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Kate Moss series?

Original, signed: £277,200, from Sotheby’s online auction in March 2021.

Special colour, signed: £68,750 for a magenta Kate Moss, from Christie’s in London on 18 March 2020.

Back up

Jack and Jill

Jack & Jill by Banksy

Banksy’s Jack & Jill

Banksy’s Jack and Jill, also known as Police Kids, laces the traditional English nursery rhyme with dark humour. The two children wear bulky police vests to protect themselves from tumbling down the hill, or worse. The print has been interpreted as we are too smothered by safety regulations or, conversely, that society is in need of more protection than ever. The Jack and Jill prints with a blue background were released in 2005 in 200 unsigned and 150 signed editions. In the same year, Banksy released 22 artist’s proofs with a pink background.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Jack and Jill series?

Unsigned: £44,000 from Bonhams in London on 25 February 2021.

Signed:  £123,500 from Forum Auctions London on 27 January 2021.

Back up

I Fought The Law

I Fought The Law by Banksy

Banksy’s I Fought The Law

Controversial and anti-authoritarian, Banksy’s I Fought the Law is inspired by footage of John Hinckley’s attempted assassination of President Ronald Reagan in 1981. But instead of being a killer, the criminal here is a street artist. The text he paints on the wall, I FOUGHT THE LAW AND I WON, is a play on a 1979 song by The Clash, I Fought The Law (and The Law Won).

Banksy released I Fought the Law as a print in 2004, in 150 signed and 500 unsigned editions, along with a total of 32 artist’s proofs in orange, pink, yellow and red colourways.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s I Fought the Law series?

Unsigned: HK$470,800 (£45,208) from Phillips in Hong Kong on 4 December 2020.

Signed: £62,500, from Christie’s online auction in April 2021.

Artist’s Proof: £125,000 for an I Fought the Law (AP – Red) from Christie’s online auction in April 2021.

Back up

Have A Nice Day

Have A Nice Day by Banksy

Banksy’s Have A Nice Day

Banksy’s sarcastically titled Have a Nice Day shows 27 riot police officers and a tank walking menacingly towards the viewer. Like his print Flying Copper, the officers have bright yellow smiley faces, suggesting their friendly characters are not what they seem. The Have a Nice Day print was released in 2003 as 67 signed editions and 350 unsigned editions, along with 31 artist’s proofs.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Have a Nice Day series?

Unsigned: NZ$148,198 (£75,972) from International Art Centre in Auckland on 30 September 2020.

Signed: £52,000, from Forum Auctions London on 4 September 2020.

Artist’s Proof: £100,250, from Bonhams in London on 15 December 2020.

Back up

Grin Reaper

Grin Reaper by Banksy

Banksy’s Grin Reaper

Banksy’s Grin Reaper, a pun on the Grim Reaper, depicts the hooded, skeletal figure of Death with a disconcerting, bright yellow smiley face – a motif which Banksy also used in Flying Copper and Have a Nice Day. The smiley face is both a symbol of 90s rave and acid house music, as well as the artist’s warning against trusting first impressions. Grin Reaper was originally a mural at London’s Old Street, then released in 2005 as 300 signed editions.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Grin Reaper series?

Signed: £106,500, from Bonham’s in London on 15 December 2020.

Back up

Golf Sale

Golf Sale by Banksy

Banksy’s Golf Sale

Banksy’s Golf Sale is directly inspired by the famous photograph of Tiananmen Square’s Tank Man, taken by Jeff Widener in 1989. But instead of standing bravely in defence of democracy, the unknown protester is promoting a golf sale, in the style of placards often seen around London’s Oxford Street. “We can’t do anything to change the world until capitalism crumbles. In the meantime, we should all go shopping to console ourselves,” Banksy once wrote. Golf Sale was released in 2003 in 150 signed and 600 unsigned editions, making it one of Banksy’s earliest prints.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Golf Sale series?

Unsigned: $52,500 (£37,947) from Heritage Auctions in Dallas on 10 February 2021.

Signed: £75,400, from Forum Auctions London on 27 January 2021.

Back up

Festival

Festival by Banksy

Banksy’s Festival

Banksy’s Festival print, also called Destroy Capitalism, depicts a line of festival goers – including punks, goths, hippies and ordinary civilians – all queuing up to buy the same ‘Destroy Capitalism’ t-shirt for $30. The artwork pokes fun of the hypocrisy of self-proclaimed anti-capitalists and the way they still buy into the capitalist system. As Banksy wrote in his book Wall and Piece, “People seem to think if they dress like a revolutionary, they don’t actually have to behave like one.”

Festival was released at Banksy’s Barely Legal exhibition in Los Angeles in 2006 as 150 signed and 500 unsigned edition prints – along with signed artist’s proofs in grey and brown colourways, and printer’s proofs.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Festival series?

Unsigned: €50,700 (£44,864), from Digard in Paris on 12 June 2017.

Signed: £60,000, from Phillips in London on 23 January 2020.

Artist’s Proof: £126,000 for a grey colourway Festival Colour A/P, from Sotheby’s online auction in March 2021.

Back up

Di Faced Tenners

Di Faced Tenners by Banksy

Banksy’s Di Faced Tenners

A pun on the word ‘defaced’, Banksy’s Di Faced Tenner is a counterfeit £10 note featuring the late Princess Diana’s face instead of a portrait of Queen Elizabeth II. The graffiti artist dropped a suitcase of close to 100,000 Di Faced Tenners into the crowd at Notting Hill Carnival in 2004, though he has forged almost £100,000,000 of fake currency in total. In 2004, Banksy released Di Faced Tenner as limited-edition prints featuring an uncut sheet of five £10 notes – one release in 50 signed editions, another in 32 signed artist’s proofs.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Di Faced Tenner series?

Signed: £30,000, from Sotheby’s online auction in March 2020.

Artist’s Proof: €32,784 (£28,072), from Tajan in Paris on 30 March 2017.

Back up

Applause

Applause by Banksy

Banksy’s Applause

In Banksy’s Applause, two air traffic controllers are preparing a fighter jet for take-off. One is holding a sign written APPLAUSE, much like a cue card at a live audience show. The print is a clear disapproval of the media and the way they turn politics and violence into a form of entertainment, causing the public to become desensitised to the true nature of war. The Applause prints were released at Banksy’s Barely Legal exhibition in Los Angeles in 2006. It exists in 500 unsigned and 150 signed editions.

What’s the auction record for any one of Banksy’s Applause series?

Unsigned: $60,000 (£43,368), from Heritage Auctions in Dallas on 10 February 2021.

Signed: £87,750, from Bonhams in London on 15 December 2020.

 

To find out how much your print is worth in today’s market, request a valuation today.

Back to top

Articles

Art for Sale

View All (65)

Related Artists

Related Art

View All (57)