5 Year Print Market Review 2023

Lovers

Despite its minimalism, Stik’s Lovers brims with a sense of love's security: two of Stik’s iconic stickmen figures embrace, facing inwards to each other. Their anonymity recalls Surrealist René Magritte’s The Lovers, but Stik takes this ambiguity further, deliberately giving obscuring his figures' genders to subvert typically heteronormative images of lovers.

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Meaning & Analysis

A pair of screenprints depicting Stik’s signature motif, the stick man, Lovers shows two figures locked in embrace, quite literally joined at the hip.

In Lovers, two stickmen embrace. While one has their eyes closed, indicated by two lines, the other has a startled gaze towards the former. The figure on the left wraps an arm under the chin of the second, while the second has one hand on the first’s body and the other wrapped around their lover’s waist. The figures are equal in height, literally joined at the hip, with the outline of one side of each of their bodies sharing a single line. The figures’ lack of clear gender identity is particularly potent here, subverting conventional images of lovers embracing. The anonymity of the image in Lovers recalls Magritte’s The Lovers, but the minimalist ambiguity of the figures in this series takes the lack of legible identity further.

Images of two figures in physical contact are not uncommon in STIK’s oeuvre. There is Holding Hands, perhaps STIK’s most recognised work, which drew couples of all kinds to pose alongside its statue in Hoxton Square. Then there is A Couple Hold Hands in the Street, voted the UK’s 17th favourite street art piece in a nationwide poll. But Lovers is perhaps Stik’s most intimate depiction of physical closeness between two of his iconic six-line figures. Departing from the overtly political themes of other key works, Lovers is a rare representation of romantic affection. The image originates in a mural painted by STIK in opposition to the local council’s clampdown on a squat in Dalston Lane. He stated of the community to which the mural was dedicated: 'The squat was a safe house for people from oppressive regimes, for queer and transgender people who were not safe in their home towns or home countries… There was no real service like it within the mainstream infrastructure – this was something that was lacking.'

In the image, the figures look inwards towards each other, rather than outwards, as is more conventional in the artist’s portfolio. As such, there is an emphasis on interpersonal closeness and warmth. While STIK’s figures tend to look out to the wider world, these stickmen appear to retreat from it, finding security in an embrace.

10 Facts About Stik's Lovers

Lovers (orange) by Stik

Lovers (orange) © Stik 2011

1. The series originated from a mural Stik painted in Dalston.

Stik first painted his embracing Lovers as a mural in Dalston, which was executed to signal his opposition to the local council's clampdown on a squat in Dalston Lane. This was a cause close to Stik's heart, as the artist recalled: "The squat was a safe house for people from oppressive regimes, for queer and transgender people who were not safe in their home towns or home countries… There was no real service like it within the mainstream infrastructure – this was something that was lacking."

Onbu (green) by Stik

Onbu (green) © Stik 2013

2. Stik champions love.

Through his genderless stick figures, Stik champions universal love in his work. Stik shows in his Lovers series that, regardless of gender, sexual orientation, race, or class, everyone deserves love. Similarly, Stik turned his Holding Hands figures into the subject of a Pride banner in 2017, speaking to his promotion of love in its many forms.

Lovers (blue) by Stik

Lovers (blue) © Stik 2011

3. Stik's figures are literally joined at the hip.

While Stik's iconic figures are usually always composed of six lines, each of his Lovers are only formed of 5 lines. The figures are joined by a singular line at the centre of the composition, literally joining them at the hip and heightening the romantic appeal of the work.

The Big Issue (complete ssmplue (et) by Stik

The Big Issue (complete set) © Stik 2013