5 Year Print Market Review 2023

Kiku

Andy Warhol’s Kiku (1983) portfolio, Japanese for Chrysanthemum, was commissioned by Fujio Watanuki—patron of the arts and the Japanese avant-garde, and founder of the Gendai Hanga Center in Tokyo. The three Kiku prints are unusually small in scale, suited to the conventional size of Japanese living spaces.

Buy and sell Andy Warhol prints

Kiku (F. & S. II.309) - Signed Print by Andy Warhol 1983 - MyArtBroker
Kiku (F. & S. II.309) Signed Print 
Andy Warhol

£25,000-£35,000 VALUE (EST.)

$45,000-$60,000 VALUE (EST.)

$40,000-$60,000 VALUE (EST.)

¥210,000-¥290,000 VALUE (EST.)

28,000-40,000 VALUE (EST.)

$240,000-$340,000 VALUE (EST.)

¥4,010,000-¥5,610,000 VALUE (EST.)

$30,000-$45,000 VALUE (EST.)

Kiku (F. & S. II.308) - Signed Print by Andy Warhol 1983 - MyArtBroker
Kiku (F. & S. II.308) Signed Print 
Andy Warhol

£25,000-£35,000 VALUE (EST.)

$45,000-$60,000 VALUE (EST.)

$40,000-$60,000 VALUE (EST.)

¥210,000-¥290,000 VALUE (EST.)

28,000-40,000 VALUE (EST.)

$240,000-$340,000 VALUE (EST.)

¥4,010,000-¥5,610,000 VALUE (EST.)

$30,000-$45,000 VALUE (EST.)

Kiku (F. & S. II.307) - Signed Print by Andy Warhol 1983 - MyArtBroker
Kiku (F. & S. II.307) Signed Print 
Andy Warhol

£50,000-£70,000 VALUE (EST.)

$90,000-$120,000 VALUE (EST.)

$80,000-$120,000 VALUE (EST.)

¥420,000-¥590,000 VALUE (EST.)

60,000-80,000 VALUE (EST.)

$480,000-$680,000 VALUE (EST.)

¥8,020,000-¥11,230,000 VALUE (EST.)

$60,000-$90,000 VALUE (EST.)

Kiku (complete set) - Signed Print by Andy Warhol 1983 - MyArtBroker
Kiku (complete set) Signed Print 
Andy Warhol

£90,000-£130,000 VALUE (EST.)

$160,000-$230,000 VALUE (EST.)

$150,000-$220,000 VALUE (EST.)

¥760,000-¥1,090,000 VALUE (EST.)

100,000-150,000 VALUE (EST.)

$870,000-$1,260,000 VALUE (EST.)

¥14,440,000-¥20,850,000 VALUE (EST.)

$110,000-$160,000 VALUE (EST.)

Sell Your Art
with Us

Join Our Network of Collectors. Buy, Sell and Track Demand

Submission takes less than 2 minutes & there's zero obligation to sell
The Only Dedicated Print Market IndexTracking 48,500 Auction HistoriesSpecialist Valuations at the Click of a Button Build Your PortfolioMonitor Demand & Supply in Network Sell For Free to our 25,000 Members

Meaning & Analysis

A series studying the Chrysanthemum flower, or in Japanese, Kiku, Warhol created 300 screen print portfolios of this motif in 1983. In 1983, Fujio Watanuki, a longstanding supporter of the Japanese avant-garde and founder of the Gendai Hanga Center in Tokyo, invited Warhol to create a new body of work inspired by Japanese flowers. The result is Kiku, a stunning series that centres on the chrysanthemum flower, or Kiku in Japanese. Warhol created 300 screen print portfolios with three prints in each portfolio. The artist also experimented with different colours and collaged layouts, resulting in unique pieces that did not form part of the final portfolio. The works were made in a uniquely small scale in order to suit the conventional size of Japanese living spaces.

The series is pure Pop Art as it unites the artist’s interests in repetition, bold graphic iconography and everyday imagery. Warhol went on to return to the subject of the flower in works such as Flower for Tacoma Dome and Daisy.

10 Facts About Andy Warhol's Kiku

Kiku (F. & S. II.307) by Andy Warhol - MyArtBroker

Kiku (F. & S. II.307) © Andy Warhol 1983

1. The series depicts the Chrysanthemum flower.

In this unconventionally small print portfolio, Warhol depicted the blossoming chrysanthemum flower across three screen prints. In his archetypal style, Warhol transformed the natural colouring of these blossoms, making them appear artificial and graphic. Particularly in Kiku (F. & S. II.307), the gradient background foregrounds Warhol’s considered outlining of the flower’s petals. Despite their small scale, the Kiku prints are dynamic and compelling.

Flowers (F. & S. II.6) by Andy Warhol - MyArtBroker

Flowers (F. & S. II.6) © Andy Warhol 1964

2. Warhol regularly depicted flowers since 1964.

Since the early days of his artistic career, Warhol depicted a wide variety of flowers. From his extensive Flowers series in the 1960s, to depictions of singular flowers in the 1980s, flowers are one of Warhol's most frequently revisited subjects. With his signature Pop palette, Warhol transforms the delicate flower into a bold two-dimensional presence in his prints.

Kiku (F. & S. II.309) by Andy Warhol - MyArtBroker

Kiku (F. & S. II.309) © Andy Warhol 1983

3. The series was commissioned by Fujio Watanuki.

This 1983 screen print series was commissioned by Fujio Watanuki, a proponent of the Japanese avant-garde and founder of the Gendai Hanga Center in Tokyo. Watanuki invited Warhol to create the Kiku series, signifying both Warhol’s global appeal and the artist’s interest in Japanese iconography in his own printing process.

Gems (F. & S. II.88) by Andy Warhol - MyArtBroker

Gems (F. & S. II.88) © Andy Warhol 1978