Joan Miró

Joan Miró

Joan Miró was a Spanish surrealist painter and sculptor.

Born in Barcelona in 1893, Miró showed an early passion for art, taking classes whilst at school, before enrolling at School of Industrial and Fine Arts in Barcelona. Inspired by the work of Vincent Van Gogh, Marc Chagall and Paul Cezanne, Miro’s early works such as, The Farm, were fauvist in style. In 1924, however, Miró joined the Surrealist movement and began to use his compositions as a chance to “to rediscover the sources of human feeling”. Inspired by works by artists such as Marc Chagall, Wassily Kandisnky and Paul Klee, his artwork adopted many of the characteristics associated with Surrealism; subverting traditional forms with the aim of finding new ways to depict them, such as The Red Sun.

In 1975 Miró opened the Fundació Joan Miró in Barcelona; a museum honoring modern art through exhibitions, projects and collaborations.

As one of the world’s most famous surrealist painters, Miró’s paintings and prints are displayed in galleries all over the world and can sell for anywhere between $250,000 and $17 million.