10 Facts About David Hockney’s Interiors & Exteriors

 David Hockney’s Rue De Seine. A black and white intaglio print of an interior room setting of a bouquet of flowers in front of a window with visible Haussman buildings. Rue De Seine © David Hockney 1972
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David Hockney

David Hockney

631 works

A master of light, colour, and perspective, David Hockney's works transcend the ordinary and beckon viewers into a world where every brushstroke is a revelation. Interiors and Exteriors explores the genius of Hockney through a prism of settings, where his innovation thrives in this exquisite collection that highlights his diverse printmaking techniques. Hockney's penchant for ingenuity and limitless creativity is alive in this collection, sporting works that range from minimalist, monochromatic etchings, to his more radiant, vibrant, swimming pools. Hockney’s multiple viewpoints offer viewers a chance to see the world through his eyes: a canvas of endless imagination and expression.

1.

It’s a Marriage of Both Interior and Exterior Settings

David Hockney’s Caribbean Tea TimeCaribbean Tea Time. A lithographic screenprint of an open folding panel depicting an outdoor patio setting and pool with vibrant shades of yellow, red, and purple.Caribbean Tea Time © David Hockney 1987

In Caribbean Tea Time, Hockney ingeniously uses a folding panel to merge interior and exterior worlds, offering a fresh perspective similar to looking out of a window. This composition, deviating from his typical style, brilliantly demonstrates perspective through its physical structure, enhancing the interplay between internal and external spaces. Hockney's distinctive approach in this artwork not only fuses different environments but also adds a dynamic layer to the viewing experience, akin to moving through spaces.

2.

Hockney Displays His Appreciation for Architecture

 David Hockney’s French Shop. A black and white intaglio print of the exterior of a modern shaped building with a plant and the moniker “ALIMENTATION” on the building. French Shop © David Hockney 1971

Hockney's keen eye for exterior architecture is evident in his vivid depiction of varied architectural landscapes. From the sun-drenched modernist structures of Los Angeles to the timeless elegance of classic Haussmann buildings seen in Rue De Seine, Hockney captures the essence of each locale. His portrayal not only showcases his versatility but also reflects a deep appreciation for the architectural diversity that characterises different regions and cultures. Through Hockney's lens, these structures become integral, characterful elements of his compositions.

3.

Expansive Perspectives in View Of Hotel Well II

David Hockney’s View Of Hotel Well II. A lithographic print of a panoramic view of an exterior setting of a hotel’s well.View Of Hotel Well II © David Hockney 1985

Hockney's View Of Hotel Well II, echoing the style of his Hotel Acatlán works from the Moving Focus collection, presents a nearly perfect panoramic view of an exterior scene. This artwork transcends the conventional flat, focused perspective, inviting viewers into a more immersive experience. Hockney's technique allows for an expansive visual journey, offering a vantage point that extends both above and around, creating a sense of being enveloped within the landscape.

4.

Mastery of Light in Monochrome

David Hockney’s Home. A black and white etching of a cushioned chair in front of a window with drapes drawn beside it.Home © David Hockney 1969

Hockney's Home showcases his exceptional skill in using light to evoke vivid imagery, even in the absence of colour. This simple etching of a chair in front of a window, with drapes elegantly drawn aside, reveals a bright sky and hints at lush greenery outside, all conveyed through masterful light play. Hockney's genius lies in his ability to bring forth the same emotions typically elicited by colour, purely through his manipulation of light.

5.

Furniture as a Central Element in Hockney's Art

David Hockney’s Views Of Hotel Well III. A lithographic print of the exterior setting of a hotel well and its outdoor patio setting surrounded by pillars.Views Of Hotel Well III © David Hockney 1985

In Hockney's compositions, everyday items like furniture, cushions, and accent tables play a pivotal role, standing alongside his genius in colour and light manipulation. These objects are not just accessories; they are integral to his narrative, capturing the essence of the scene. Hockney's ability to elevate these ordinary items to subjects of artistic importance showcases his perspective on the mundane, transforming it into something extraordinary.

6.

Progression of Perspective in Hotel Well

David Hockney’s Views Of Hotel Well I. A lithographic print of the interior and exterior setting of a hotel well and its patio setting surrounded by pillars and exposed interior covering. Views Of Hotel Well I © David Hockney 1985

David Hockney's Views of Hotel Well I, Hotel Well II, and Hotel Well III offer a fascinating insight into his artistic process, presenting the same subject through three distinct perspectives. Hotel Well II provides an overhead panoramic experience, while Hotel Well III employs a vivid, saturated colour palette to enhance depth and distance. In contrast, Hotel Well I appears as a more straightforward, everyday depiction, capturing a view one might initially observe. Together, these pieces illustrate the evolution of Hockney's sight and his compositional adaptability, showcasing his ability to reinterpret a singular scene in multiple, profound ways.

7.

Capturing Texture Through Shadow

David Hockney’s Cushions. A black and white etching of an interior setting of a cushioned nook area in front of closed shutters and a house plant.Cushions © David Hockney 1968

Hockney's adept use of shadows enables him to vividly depict textures, as seen in works like Cushions and Sofa 8501 Hedges Place. While both pieces focus on seemingly simple subjects, each conveys a distinct mood. In Sofa 8501 Hedges Place, there is a relaxed, lived-in quality, achieved through Hockney's careful composition of shapes and shadows. Conversely, Cushions presents a more refined atmosphere, featuring an array of perfectly arranged cushions with varied geometric shapes, all rendered with a plush realism. This difference in treatment highlights Hockney's versatility in conveying texture and atmosphere through shadow.

8.

Refinement in Diverse Printmaking

David Hockney’s The Studio, March 16th 1995. A digital print of the interior of David Hockney’s studio with multiple artworks on display.The Studio, March 16th 1995 © David Hockney 1996

Hockney's mastery in printmaking techniques is evident in his interiors and exteriors series. Often overlooked, these works are a testament to his exceptional compositional skills and craftsmanship, meticulously brought to life through various print forms. Hockney's repertoire includes etching, lithography, intaglio, and digital print, each technique adding its unique texture and depth to his works. His proficiency in these methods not only showcases his versatility as an artist but also enriches the visual narrative of each piece, allowing him to explore and express intricate details and layers within his work.

9.

Exploration of Scale

David Hockney’s The Studio, March 28th 1995. A digital print of the interior of David Hockney’s studio with multiple artworks on display.The Studio, March 28th 1995 © David Hockney 1996

Hockney's experimentation with scale is strikingly evident when comparing The Studio, March 16th 1995 and The Studio, March 28th 1995. In The Studio, March 28th 1995, the focus is narrowed, honing in predominantly on a large centrepiece against the wall. This creates an intimate, detailed view. Conversely, The Studio, March 16th 1995 adopts a more expansive perspective, effectively zooming out to encompass a broader view of the studio space. This wider angle captures multiple works, both completed and in progress, offering a comprehensive insight into Hockney's creative environment. This juxtaposition in scale and perspective showcases Hockney's skill in manipulating the viewer's engagement with space and subject matter.

10.

The Quintessential Swimming Pool

David Hockney’s Caribbean Tea TimeCaribbean Tea Time. A lithographic screenprint of an open folding panel depicting an outdoor patio setting and pool with vibrant shades of yellow, red, and purple. Caribbean Tea Time © David Hockney 1987

In Caribbean Tea Time, Hockney incorporates a quintessential element of his lexicon: his Swimming Pools. This time, however, he reinvents the motif with a unique twist. Hockney creates an illusion of waves and movement through a pattern of swirls and circles, employing different gradients of colour. This approach not only adds a dynamic quality to the pool but also reflects his ongoing exploration of water as a subject, a recurring theme in many of his iconic works. This piece reaffirms the swimming pool as a signature element in Hockney's oeuvre, symbolising both his stylistic evolution and enduring fascination with water.