Perhaps fittingly for the artist who was known for gaining inspiration from the masters that went before him, Andy Warhol influenced many of his contemporaries as well as later generations. Here we take a look at some of the pieces and projects that might not have existed without a little help from the undeniable King of Pop Art.

Banksy Soup Can Signed Print

Banksy, Soup Can

1. Banksy’s Soup Can

Depicting a single can of cream of tomato soup can with the familiar branding of the now defunct Tesco Value range, Banksy’s Soup Can is an obvious nod to Warhol’s famous 1962 series of Campbell’s Soup Can paintings that were later produced as prints. Contrary to Warhol’s homage to the endlessly reproduced images of consumer society, here Banksy offers a biting criticism of the supermarket giant who has come to take over the contemporary marketplace.

2. Haring’s Pop Shop

Designed to make his art more accessible and affordable to the general public Keith Haring’s Pop Shop in SoHo opened its doors in 1986, attracting art collectors and kids alike with its range of merchandise and prints featuring his work. While Haring had his own inimitable style there is no doubt this venture was influenced in part by Warhol’s popularisation of the screen printing technique and his love for large edition sizes.

Keith Haring Pop Shop Warhol inspiration

Keith Haring, Pop Shop V: A

3. The KAWS Companion

While Roy Lichtenstein can be said to be a big influence on Brooklyn based artist KAWS’ work, his love for cartoon characters, flat colour and affordable editions can also be traced back to Warhol. Most notably, the KAWS Companion is an obvious homage to Mickey Mouse, whom Warhol also celebrated in his Myths series in 1981.

Kaws Companion Andy Warhol inspiration

KAWS, Companion (grey)

4. Harland Miller’s Penguins

With this series Harland Miller apes the classic Penguin design, replacing iconic book covers with ironic statements in a postmodern take on Warhol’s repositioning of household objects and foodstuffs as high art. While Warhol tended to represent these objects accurately, however, here Miller adds a satirical message that both pokes fun at the viewer and invites you to come in on the joke.

Harland Miller Penguin How Andy Warhol shaped the art world as we know it

Harland Miller, Rags to Polyester

5. Damien Hirst’s Spots

One of the leading YBAs, Hirst is perhaps best known for his ubiquitous spot paintings. And while the initial ones were painstakingly hand painted, the later canvases were made by a team of assistants, similar to how Warhol developed his screen printing practice in the Factory.

Damien Hirst Tetrahydrocannabinol spot How Andy Warhol shaped the art world as we know it

Damien Hirst, Tetrahydrocannabinol, 2004

6. Julia Wachtel’s Silk Screens

Working with screen prints and found images, Julia Wachtel has acknowledged her debt to Warhol saying recently in an interview, ‘I remember going to MoMA and seeing his “Campbell Soup Cans” [1962], and it was at that moment I decided to become an artist.’

Julia Wachtel, Landscape, How Andy Warhol shaped the art world as we know it

Julia Wachtel, Landscape No. 19 (Witness), 2014

7. Glenn Ligon’s Colouring Book

Glenn Ligon, who is perhaps most famous for his Colouring Book series which saw him invite children to colour in his outlines of famous figures such as Malcom X, is also a fan of Warhol and particularly his use of colour.

Glenn Ligon Malcolm X Warhol inspiration

Glenn Ligon, Malcolm X, 2000

8. Julian Opie’s Portraits

With their vacant stares and bright coloured backgrounds, Julian Opie’s portraits of celebrities as well as ordinary people can be said to be the contemporary equivalent to Warhol’s silkscreen paintings and prints of Marilyn Monroe, Liz Taylor and Jackie Kennedy.

Julian Opie Andy Warhol inspiration

Julian Opie, Damon Albarn, 2000

9. Al Wei Wei’s Coca-Cola Vase

With works such as Coca-Cola Vase Ai Wei Wei uses traditional Chinese arts and crafts to highlight the damages of consumerism and globalisation that have come to characterise the age of late capitalism. While Warhol celebrated the iconicity and nostalgia of brands such as Coca Cola here Ai Wei Wei seems to be decrying their ubiquity and the loss of cultural heritage.

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