Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein was a leading figure in the American Pop Art movement.

In the 1950s, Roy Lichtenstein lived in New York and created his own form of abstract expressionism by incorporating themes such as cowboys and Indians into his compositions. In 1961, he began to experiment with bright, graphic works that parodied American popular culture. Borrowing art techniques from the printing industry, Lichtenstein produced pictures based on comic strip images. He painted advertising imagery alongside highly sophisticated references to art history, before littering them with his Ben-Day dots, lettering and speech balloons, all of which would become signatures of his artwork.

During the 1960s, Lichtenstein became one of the world’s most famous pop artists, noted for his works Whaam!, Hopeless, Kiss II, and Drowning Girl. Throughout the rest of his career, he continued to produce paintings, limited edition prints and sculptures that incorporated pop culture themes, exhibiting these in more than 240 solo exhibitions in galleries around the world.